Grey Nomads Caravans and Campers


Doug i f***** told ya ten times to leave that boat back in Brissy !!!!!

Living in Outback Queensland, it is the time of year again (winter) when our quite little country towns become chock a block full of grey nomads, they boost our economy and bring tales of there travels.

Grey nomads are loved by people in the outback, they are always polite and are mostly interested in our community and what we get up too out here.



Birdsville Hotel



Grey nomads are normally older Australians, who after the kids have flown the coop and are no longer life's daily preoccupation, thousands of them hit the road and stay there.
Many of the grey nomads i have met outback, have been on the road for many years, one couple i met are still doing it after 16 years.


Hey man which way to Nimbin?
The nomadic lifestyle is becoming an option not just for hippies and tourists. The driving force behind its surge in popularity is our Baby Boomers retiring.

According to the Australia Bureau of Statistics there were more than 48,510 registered camper vans in Australia in 2010 an increase of  19.2% since 2005.

Seasonal work might once have been the domain of the young and the restless, but older workers are also increasingly getting into the industry.



While fruit picking might sound like back-breaking work, there are plenty of less demanding jobs available on fruit farms.

You can grade fruit, drive machinery, pack fruit, do some pruning and weeding, so fruit picking is something that has a growing appeal to grey nomads.


Grandparents Gwen and Ron Hellyar  travelled more than 1500km to help a family in western Queensland

Some of the remote outback stations out here, also look for extra help during their busy seasons.
Small odd jobs like painting, looking after the kids, or any handyman things that may need fixing, is a big help for these remote stations.  contact  www.frontierservices.org/outbacklinks/